Mapping the Virus: The EHV Outbreak from Space, According to Google

map of infectious disease equine herpes virus

A Google Map compiled by The Veterinary Infection Control Society (VICS) indicates the approximate location and number of cases of EHV-1 related to the cutting horses infected at an event in Utah earlier this month. The numbers are more specifically laid out for you in a chart below. Note: Map locations are indicated only to the state level. Markers do not currently indicate specific location of cases. (Map and chart courtesy of The Equid Blog.)

Note: this map and chart are only up-to-date to Wednesday, May 18 and only include cases that have been verified by The Veterinary Infection Control Society.

Is a picture worth a thousand words? This map was created by The Veterinary Infection Control Society (VICS) and is posted on The Equid Blog of Dr Scott Weese and Dr Maureen Anderson at the Ontario Veterinary College. The Equid Blog kindly contributed to The Jurga Report‘s coverage of the EHV outbreaks over the past weekend. In case you are having difficulty discerning state and provincial borders or are not familiar with the geography of the western United States and Canada, the data has been extrapolated and compiled in a chart for you.

EHV cases

EHV cases and suspected cases as of May 18

The Equid Blog notes: “As with most outbreaks, this is a rapidly changing situation with often incomplete data, so data regarding the number of infected horses must be interpreted with caution, but the preliminary data are reported above. Currently, data are only available from a few individuals so the numbers are low, but it is expected that the numbers will increase as more reports come in.”

Something that has occurred to me as well is the absolute necessity of horse owner compliance with requests to report sick horses to their veterinarians and/or state authorities. Just as we are seeing that some shortcomings are being identified in getting information out to horse owners, there may be an equal difficulty on the other side of getting information in.

These cases are all believed to be within a group of horses that competed in a cutting horse event in Utah in early May.

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Posted in EHV, biosecurity, disease, veterinary, virus | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

17 Responses to “Mapping the Virus: The EHV Outbreak from Space, According to Google”

  1. Mrs Mom says:

    Thanks for all your hard work on this Fran, and keeping us all posted. Hoping it does not spread to the east coast but we suspect it is just a matter of time before it does.

  2. [...] UPDATED (5/18/11) map of areas across North America affected by Equine Herpesvirus-1: Mapping the Virus: The EHV Outbreak from Space, According to Google. [...]

  3. Emily Esterson says:

    Missing New Mexico data.
    New Mexico – 2-3 horse affected, 1 euthanized

  4. AppyLois says:

    I pray that this terrible out break will leave as quickly as it appeared . And again thank you for tracing it for us . And lets hope it goes away before some drug company makes billions off selling a drug that is a so called cure . Like some of the other so called out breaks we have had over the last few years . Skeptical yes you know I am , we cant trust anything for face value now days .

    Thanks, AppyLois

  5. Christine Parr says:

    missing Texas data

    • Fran Jurga says:

      I’m sure that VICS will update the map as they receive official vertifications. They have updated the Oregon case.

  6. [...] now, anyone concerned over the current EHV-1 outbreak has been able to find multiple sources of information on the spread of cases and on basics of the [...]

  7. Jodie says:

    Can you tell us where in California the 10 cases have been?

    • Fran Jurga says:

      Hi Jodie,
      I’m sorry, but they don’t make that information available. The counties are listed in the “roundup” post on this blog under California but that is as specific as I have. Sorry!

  8. Laura Headley says:

    Press releases for Oregon horses:

    Second Oregon horse tests positive for Equine Herpes Virus

    May 19, 2011… A second Oregon horse has tested positive for a neurological form of Equine Herpes Virus traced to a horse show in Utah. Confirmation of Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) has been made on a horse in Umatilla County that was in close contact with other horses that had attended the Utah show. This follows confirmation earlier this week that a Clackamas County horse had tested positive for EHM. In both cases, those horses that attended the show and those stabled at the same facilities are quarantined and are being closely monitored. None of the animals show any symptoms of the disease at this time.

    Horses that participated in the National Cutting Horse Association’s Western National Championship in Ogden, Utah from April 30 through May 8 may have been exposed to the virus.

    The virus has been confirmed in other states, including Washington, Idaho, California, and Colorado. In all, 20 Oregon horses attended the Utah show. All 20 remain quarantined in their stables, along with any other horses located in those facilities, and are closely monitored.

    A statewide network of veterinarians has been alerted about the disease. All suspected and confirmed cases of EHM are to be reported to State Veterinarian Dr. Don Hansen of the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

    EHM is not transmissible to people, but it is a serious disease of horses that can cause respiratory, neurologic disease and death. The most common way for EHM to spread is by direct horse-to-horse contact. The virus can also spread through the air, contaminated equipment, clothing, and hands.

    Symptoms include fever, decreased coordination, nasal discharge, urine dribbling, loss of tail tone, hind limb weakness, leaning against a wall or fence to maintain balance, lethargy, and the inability to rise. While there is no cure, the symptoms of the disease may be treatable.

    The state veterinarian advises horse owners to practice strict biosecurity measures and hygiene if they travel to shows and competitions with their animals. Horse owners are also directed to contact their veterinarian if they have any questions.

    Since all 20 Oregon horses that attended the Utah event are accounted for and remain quarantined at their facilities, ODA believes there is little risk of the EHM virus connected to the horse show spreading to other locations in the state at this time.

    ——————-

    Media Contact: Bruce Pokarney, ODA, at (503) 986-4559.

    and

    Second Oregon horse tests positive for Equine Herpes Virus

    May 19, 2011… A second Oregon horse has tested positive for a neurological form of Equine Herpes Virus traced to a horse show in Utah. Confirmation of Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) has been made on a horse in Umatilla County that was in close contact with other horses that had attended the Utah show. This follows confirmation earlier this week that a Clackamas County horse had tested positive for EHM. In both cases, those horses that attended the show and those stabled at the same facilities are quarantined and are being closely monitored. None of the animals show any symptoms of the disease at this time.

    Horses that participated in the National Cutting Horse Association’s Western National Championship in Ogden, Utah from April 30 through May 8 may have been exposed to the virus.

    The virus has been confirmed in other states, including Washington, Idaho, California, and Colorado. In all, 20 Oregon horses attended the Utah show. All 20 remain quarantined in their stables, along with any other horses located in those facilities, and are closely monitored.

    A statewide network of veterinarians has been alerted about the disease. All suspected and confirmed cases of EHM are to be reported to State Veterinarian Dr. Don Hansen of the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

    EHM is not transmissible to people, but it is a serious disease of horses that can cause respiratory, neurologic disease and death. The most common way for EHM to spread is by direct horse-to-horse contact. The virus can also spread through the air, contaminated equipment, clothing, and hands.

    Symptoms include fever, decreased coordination, nasal discharge, urine dribbling, loss of tail tone, hind limb weakness, leaning against a wall or fence to maintain balance, lethargy, and the inability to rise. While there is no cure, the symptoms of the disease may be treatable.

    The state veterinarian advises horse owners to practice strict biosecurity measures and hygiene if they travel to shows and competitions with their animals. Horse owners are also directed to contact their veterinarian if they have any questions.

    Since all 20 Oregon horses that attended the Utah event are accounted for and remain quarantined at their facilities, ODA believes there is little risk of the EHM virus connected to the horse show spreading to other locations in the state at this time.

    ——————-

    Media Contact: Bruce Pokarney, ODA, at (503) 986-4559.

  9. Jodie,
    Got this info on the California cases from BAEN this evening:

    The positive confirmed cases are located in the following counties: Amador(1), Glenn(2), Kern (2), Los Angeles(1), Napa(1), Placer (2), Plumas (1), and Stanislaus (3).
    One positive horse was euthanized after showing severe neurological signs associated with the disease while at the Kern County Cutting Horse Event on May 13 in Bakersfield, CA

  10. Robin says:

    2horses in new jersey also! This came from east coast wether by person or horse! Look at dates on articles from over there!

    • Fran Jurga says:

      Robin, you are correct that there were two cases in New Jersey last month, but there are often outbreaks all over the country. They are often at racetracks. The virus didn’t travel from the east coast, the virus is all over the place, all the time.

  11. Karen says:

    So far the confirmed cases in California are in the following 10 counties:
    Amador, 1;
    Glenn, 2;
    Kern, 2;
    Los Angeles, 1;
    Marin, 1;
    Napa, 1;
    Placer, 2;
    Plumas, 1;
    Shasta, 1;
    Stanislaus, 3.

  12. alicen hardy says:

    today is May 22nd, will this map be updated soon? thanks for the information.

  13. Jodi Puckett says:

    State vet advises precautions with equine herpes virus-1 (rhino)
    Three (3) Oregon horses tested positive but did not show clinical signs of the neurological herpes virus (equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy) or EHM. Confirmed cases are located in Clackamas, Umatilla, and Deschutes counties. Two (2) additional horses from Clackamas County are suspect and Oregon Department of Agriculture is waiting for test results. These positive tested cases are directly linked to the cutting event held in Utah from April 30 through May 8, 2011. A number of other cases have been confirmed in surrounding states including, Washington, Idaho, California and Colorado. EHM is a highly contagious neurological virus that can cause severe neurological symptoms in horses.
    Effective immediately EHM is a reportable disease to the state veterinarian. For clinical or suspect cases please call and report to Dr. Don Hansen, state veterinarian at (503) 986-4680, immediately.
    State Veterinarian Don Hansen urges horse owners to take precautions. Veterinarians should work closely with their equine clients to develop plans that address the clients’ ability to prevent EHM in their horses. If a horse is suspected of having EHM, the horse should be isolated. Do not use the same equipment when handling other horses.

  14. Jodi Puckett says:

    State vet advises precautions with equine herpes virus-1 (rhino)
    Three (3) Oregon horses tested positive but did not show clinical signs of the neurological herpes virus (equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy) or EHM. Confirmed cases are located in Clackamas, Umatilla, and Deschutes counties. Two (2)additional horses from Clackamas County are suspect and Oregon Department of Agriculture is waiting for test results. These positive tested cases are directly linked to the cutting event held in Utah from April 30 through May 8, 2011. A number of other cases have been confirmed in surrounding states including, Washington, Idaho, California and Colorado. EHM is a highly contagious neurological virus that can cause severe neurological symptoms in horses.
    Effective immediately EHM is a reportable disease to the state veterinarian. For clinical or suspect cases please call and report to Dr. Don Hansen, state veterinarian at (503) 986-4680, immediately.
    State Veterinarian Don Hansen urges horse owners to take precautions. Veterinarians should work closely with their equine clients to develop plans that address the clients’ ability to prevent EHM in their horses. If a horse is suspected of having EHM, the horse should be isolated. Do not use the same equipment when handling other horses.

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